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Permanent Committee (PAC)

​​​​​​​​A Permanent Committee is a group of individuals, including an association, committee or organization, other than a campaign committee, political issues committee, inaugural committee, or party executive committee, which is established as, or intended to be a permanent organization having as a primary purpose expressly advocating the election or defeat of one (1) or more clearly identified candidates, slates of candidates or political parties, which functions on a regular basis throughout the year.​​ ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​KRS 121.015(3)(d)

Permanent Committee (PAC) Reporting Dates
YearReportPeriod EndsReport DueDue From
20171st Quarter report3/31/20174/5/2017All Active Permanent Committees (PACs)
20172nd Quarter report6/30/20177/10/2017All Active Permanent Committees (PACs)
20173rd Quarter report9/30/201710/6/2017All Active Permanent Committees (PACs)
20174th Quarter report12/31/20171/8/2018All Active Permanent Committees (PACs)
20181st Quarter report3/31/20184/6/2018All Active Permanent Committees (PACs)
20182nd Quarter report6/30/20187/9/2018All Active Permanent Committees (PACs)
20183rd Quarter report9/30/201810/5/2018All Active Permanent Committees (PACs)
20184th Quarter report12/31/20181/8/2019All Active Permanent Committees (PACs)
Contribution Limits For Permanent Committee (PAC)
  • From an individual: $2,000 per year Help
  • From a corporation: Prohibited
  • From an executive committee: $2,000 per year Help
  • From a caucus campaign committee: $2,000 per year Help
  • From a contributing organization Help : $2,000 per year Help
  • From a permanent committee (PAC) Help : $2,000 per year Help
  • Cash contributions Help : $100.00 per contributor per election
  • Anonymous contributions: $100.00 per contributor per election (Maximum aggregate $2,000 per election)

In-kind and monetary contributions jointly count toward both the “per election” and the “per year” contribution limits.

View all contribution limits

Permanent Committee​​ FAQ​​​​​

Political Advertising is any advertisement advocating the election or defeat of any candidate, political party, or public issue. For example, Political Advertising would NOT include the announcement of a fish fry sponsored by a political organization unless the advertisement stated that the fish fry endorses a candidate.​
A PAC is a Political Action Committee, also referred to as a Permanent Committee under Kentucky law. These committees are made up of a group of people sharing a common interest and supporting those interests by advocating the election or defeat of candidates, slates of candidates, or political parties. A PAC may contribute up to $2,000 per election to any candidate.
PACs may contribute up to $2,000 to any candidate or slate of candidates per election. This means that the PAC may contribute $2,000 in a primary and, if the candidate or slate wins the primary, the PAC may contribute $2,000 in the general election. PACs may contribute up to $2,000 per year in the aggregate to non-affiliated PACs. For example, if a PAC contributed $2,000 on January 1 of any year to another PAC, it could not make any more contributions to other PACs until January 1 of the next year. PACs may contribute up to $5,000 per year in the aggregate to a political party executive committee. This includes state and county executive committees. Because state and county executive committees are affiliated, if a contribution of $5,000 is made to a state party committee, the PAC could make no contributions to any of the county executive committees of that party in the same calendar year. PACs may contribute up to $5,000 per year in the aggregate to a caucus campaign committee. There are four caucus campaign committees. Because they are not affiliated, each caucus campaign committee may receive $5,000 per year.
Yes, a PAC may change its name. To do this, the PAC must complete another Political Committee Registration form with its new name, address, name of the sponsor of the PAC, the major business, social or political interests of the PAC, and the name of the depository bank or financial institution. This form must be signed and dated by the chairman and the treasurer. The PAC’s filer number and all financial information will stay the same.
PACs are considered affiliated based on the organization’s bylaw structure or by declaration on the PAC’s registration form. The Registry may examine the relationship between organizations to determine whether the committees are affiliated for purposes of contribution limitations. When making contributions to candidates, affiliated organizations are considered to be one (1) contributor and they are held jointly to the $2,000 contribution limit. (Example: if a state PAC made a $2,000 contribution to a candidate, the affiliated Federal PAC could not make a contribution to that candidate in that election). There are no contributions limits between affiliated PACs. The committees may transfer unlimited amounts between themselves.
No. PACs may not accept contributions from partnerships, LLCs, or LLPs.  Under Kentucky’s campaign finance law, “corporation” means any corporation, company, partnership, joint stock company, or association.  Since corporations are prohibited from making contributions directly to candidates, slates of candidates, or committees, a PAC is not permitted to accept contributions directly from a partnership.   A partnership may, however, sponsor and administer a state PAC, and pay the state PAC’s administrative expenses from its own funds.
PACs may contribute up to $2,000 to any candidate or slate of candidates per election. This means the PAC may contribute $2,000 in a primary and, if the candidate or slate wins the primary, the PAC may contribute $2,000 in the general election.
When making a contribution to candidates, affiliated organizations are considered to be one (1) contributor and they are held jointly to the $2,000 contribution limit. (Example: if a state PAC made a $2,000 contribution to a candidate, the affiliated Federal PAC could not make a contribution to that candidate in that election.)
An in-kind contribution is goods, advertising or services furnished by a PAC without charge or at a rate which is less than the rate normally charged for the goods or services. The campaign is responsible for reporting in-kind contributions on its election finance statement. An independent expenditure is the expenditure of money or other thing of value to promote a candidate, slate of candidates or committee without the campaign or any authorized person acting on behalf of the campaign having any prior knowledge of the activity. There is no limit on independent expenditures; however, an “Independent Expenditure Report” must be completed and forwarded to the Registry when the aggregate amount of the independent expenditure exceeds $500. The candidates, slate of candidates or committee are not responsible for reporting the independent expenditure on the election finance statement.
Please refer to the Registry's Approved Software page for contact information pertaining to the software you are interesting in using.​
This procedure is for records already submitted to the registry. Change the amount field to zero. Mark the record as amended. Re-submit the amended report to the Registry. Note: You may, at any time delete a record that has not been submitted to the Registry.
Please refer to the Registry's Approved Software page for contact information.
Please refer to the Registry's Approved Software page for contact information.
Some candidates will be required to file separate reports for different elections (Primary and General) during the same time period. The software selects the data with a date range. If you mix data from two elections and have separate reports for an overlapping time period, the software cannot distinguish data from one election to another.
The Registry assigns a number to a candidate for each election. This number will be assigned each time the candidate notifies the Registry of his or her intent to run for office. (The Primary and General are separate elections.)
To correct the problem, open the software, click on Tools, then select Initial Program Setup. Click on Yes to verify the correct database name, click OK to confirm the database name, and then click Next on step 0 of 53. On step 1 of 53, change the entity type to "Candidate." Continue to step 18, and click on the Cancel/Close button. Click Yes to exit Initial Program Setup. When you return to the Contributions Entry Screen, you will now be able to chose "Candidate."
Enter any receipts or expenditures as usual. On the Fundraiser screen, for the start and end date, enter the start and end date of the current reporting period. In the Event description field, enter the type of fundraising event and date it was held or will be held. Enter the Amount Raised and Amount Spent during the current reporting period.
If you have been filing manually (and have not raised or spent money toward the upcoming election), enter the beginning balance when creating the report. If you have been filing manually (and have raised or spent money toward the upcoming election), you must enter all contributions, expenses, debts, and fundraising activity from previously manually filed reports for this election period. This will ensure your cumulative totals and beginning balance will be correct.