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Frequently Asked Questions

Disclaimer Notice

These “Frequently Asked Questions” are intended merely as a general reference tool and in no way supersede applicable statutory provisions, administrative regulations or case law. The Registry recommends a complete reading of the campaign finance laws contained in KRS Chapter 121 and the administrative regulations contained in Title 32 of the Kentucky Administrative Regulations. If you have any specific questions about the subjects covered by these questions or this website, you should contact the Registry directly.​

Frequently Asked Questions
QuestionAnswer
What are caucus campaign committees?A caucus campaign committee is one of the following caucus groups which receive contributions and make expenditures to support or oppose one or more specific candidates or slates of candidates for nomination or election, or a committee: House Democratic caucus campaign committee; House Republican caucus campaign committee; Senate Democratic caucus campaign committee; or Senate Republican caucus campaign committee.​
What are caucus campaign committees?A caucus campaign committee is one of the following caucus groups which receive contributions and make expenditures to support or oppose one or more specific candidates or slates of candidates for nomination or election, or a committee: House Democratic caucus campaign committee; House Republican caucus campaign committee; Senate Democratic caucus campaign committee; or Senate Republican caucus campaign committee.
If a caucus campaign committee makes or receives no contributions in a given reporting period, is it still required to file a report?Yes. All committees must file reports whether or not they have had any financial activity.
What are the financial reporting requirements for caucus campaign committees?Caucus campaign committees file 30-day post-election finance statements for both the primary and general elections.
What is the maximum allowable contribution to a caucus campaign committee?The maximum contribution limit to a caucus campaign committee is $2,500 per calendar year (not per election). If a contributor makes a single $2,500 contribution to a particular caucus campaign committee on January 1, 20XX, that contributor cannot make any other contributions to that particular caucus campaign committee until the next calendar year. However, the contributor may contribute $2,500 to other caucus campaign committees and up to $2,500 in the aggregate to executive committees.
Can a caucus campaign committee make contributions to organizations such as the young woman’s political organization or the young collegiate political organization?No. Those organizations are primarily social in nature. However, funds may be expended for advertising with the organization so long as the expenditure furthers a candidacy.
Can partnerships contribute money to a caucus campaign committee?Yes. Partnerships may contribute to caucus campaign committees in one of two ways. First, a partnership may qualify as a contributing organization under KRS 121.015 and may contribute a maximum of $2,500 per calendar year in the aggregate. Second, the partners may contribute individually from funds derived from the partnership. If a partnership check is issued, information from the partnership must be obtained listing the percentage of the contribution attributable to each partner.
Can LLC’s and LLP’s contribute to caucus campaign committees?Yes. Limited liability companies (LLC’s) and limited liability partnerships (LLP’s) may contribute up to $2,500 per calendar year to individual caucus campaign committees.
Can a registered lobbyist make contributions to a caucus campaign committee?This question should be referred to the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission. The commission enforces the code of Legislative Ethics and regulates conduct by legislators, lobbyists and the employers of lobbyists.
Can a husband and wife contribute $5,000 on one check from a joint account?Yes, but the check must be signed by both spouses or a statement must be provided indicating the donative intent of the check.
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